Eggs . . . . . . .

Go down

Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:28 pm

You CAN Preserve Your Farm Fresh Eggs Without Refrigeration! Here's the Secret!
https://www.sooperarticles.com/home-and-family-articles/you-can-preserve-your-farm-fresh-eggs-without-refrigeration-heres-secret-3678.html

Published by: Lisa Carr

-snip-

. . . . an "old time" system of preserving eggs without refrigeration. This system requires the use of something called "water glass". Water glass is a simple name for sodium silicate which is basically liquid glass. By diluting water glass with water and submersing your eggs into the solution, the water glass apparently seals the pores of the eggshell thus preventing oxygen to penetrate the egg. With oxygen unable to penetrate the egg, the egg is thus preserved...all without refrigeration!

I have used water glass for the past 2 years, and I am very pleased with the results! The eggs hold up very well for the first 4 months. Once the eggs hit the 4-5 month mark, I am careful to crack each egg individually and "smell". If the egg gives off a sulfur smell, it is tossed. As time goes on, the whites of the eggs will get rather runny, but these eggs are still great tasting and perfect for scrambled eggs and cooking. This past year, we had our own egg supply throughout the winter and I only had to toss less than a dozen eggs! The trade-off was certainly worthwhile!

Here are a few steps I have gathered along the way to help you successfully preserve eggs without refrigeration:

1. When using water glass, use the freshest eggs on hand. Collect your eggs often so they do not get dirty and soiled! DO NOT WASH the eggs before putting them in the water glass solution! When laying, the hens provide a natural film of their own on the egg. If you wash the egg, you remove the film. If the egg is dirty, gently brush off the dirt or "poop".

2. To dilute your water glass, use 11 parts water to 1 part water glass. It is recommended that you boil the water first, then let it cool, then add the water glass. I don't know why...and I think I forgot that part last year, but it didn't seem to affect the results adversely.

3. It is recommended you use a earthenware crock to store your eggs. I have used a crock and a 5 gallon bucket...both worked fine.

4. Leave at least 2 inches of liquid above your eggs so you ensure they are completely submerged.

5. Enjoy your own home grown eggs throughout the winter months! Save money and eat healthy!

I hope you have enjoyed this bit of information. If you would like to find out the best place to obtain water glass (and trust me, I looked high and low), please follow the links below.

This article is free for republishing

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:31 pm

How To Store Fresh Eggs Without Refrigeration
http://www.greatdreams.com/egg-storage.htm

At the end of this page, you will find the USDA information on storing eggs with Liquid Sodium Silicate, known sometimes as the brand name, K-Peg. This is highly informative and very important if you are going to use this product to store eggs.

Have you ever wondered how your great-grandparents stored eggs? Perhaps they didn't, perhaps they used only fresh eggs. But many folks regularly stored their eggs and used them throughout the winter months.

Chickens normally respond to daylight by laying more eggs. Oppositely, when there is little daylight, there are fewer eggs layed. So in the winter when days are shorter, it's good to be able to depend on a fresh egg supply.

There are two ways that I know of to store eggs without refrigeration. They both require cool temperatures, however. A cellar, cool basement or cool room in the house will suffice. The cooler the better the chance that your eggs will last longer. ---CONTINUED---

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:32 pm

How To Freeze Eggs
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Eggs/FreezingEgg.htm

How To Freeze Eggs

Eggs can be frozen, but not in the shell. It's best to freeze eggs in small quantities so you can thaw only what you need. An easy way to do this is to put them in an ice cube tray. Once frozen, transfer them to a freezer container and label.

As with any frozen food, it is best to thaw eggs in the refrigerator and use them as soon as they are thawed. Only use thawed eggs in dishes that will be thoroughly cooked.


Following are some easy instructions for freezing eggs: ---CONTINUED---

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:34 pm

EGG SUBSTITUTE -
http://www.simplyprepared.com/dehydrated_and_freeze_dried_foods.htm

FOR 1 EGG: Place 3 Tbsp. cold water in a small mixing bowl. Sprinkle 1 tsp. unflavored gelatin on the water to soften; beat. Add 2 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. boiling water and beat until dissolved. Place in the freezer to thicken, about 10 minutes. Take from freezer and beat until frothy with mixer. Add to batter in place of an egg. Use in baking only.

FOR 2 EGGS: 2 tsp. gelatin, 1/3 cup cold water, 1/3 cup boiling water. Prepare as for 1 egg.

FOR 3 EGGS: 1 Tbsp. gelatin, 1/2 cup cold water, 1/2 cup boiling water. Prepare as for 1 egg.

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:35 pm

How to tell a bad egg
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/matthews53.html

By David Scott Matthews

-snip-

One day, however, a friend of ours showed us that you could judge the freshness of an egg by placing it in water about an inch deeper than the egg is long. As an egg ages, the air cell expands. So, depending on how the egg lies in the water, you can tell whether the egg is fresh enough to eat on its own, or if it is old enough that, because of the taste, you should use it only for baking, or if it is best to just discard it.

-snip-

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:37 pm

Freezing Foods-Eggs
http://eatingfoodstorage.blogspot.com/2010/03/freezing-foods.html

-snip-

One other great thing to freeze is eggs. You can live off powdered eggs (believe me, I know) but there is just no subsitute when you are craving a fried egg, so you might want to consider freezing some eggs. My friend told me how to do it. I borrowed her ...   ---CONTINUED----

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:39 pm

Powdered Eggs: Taste Test

HatTip2   Hat Tip to 'KR105' over at American Preppers Network:

PREP TEST: Powdered Eggs

I purchased the can from MRE Depot and it is the Future Essentials brand.  When I opened the can, it was surprisingly full. There was a noticable order that smelled faintly like iron / metal (and it was not the can.)


No directions were on the label so I used the directions from the Honeyville site (2 tablespoons product to 4 tablespoons water.)  As a comparison, I also pulled an egg out of the refrigerator and scrambled that.  Here is the precooked pictures:


Then I microwaved both dishes for one minute and the powdered egg product overflowed the dish in the microwave (requiring a quick cleanup.)  Here is what they looked like after cooking.


Taste:  there is one word to describe the powdered eggs:  YUCK!  It was awful and that metalic smell became a faintly metallic taste.  I'm assuming that I can use this in a recipe (and will try it when time permits) but as a scrambled egg or omlet - No Way Jose!  In a pinch you could drown it with pancake syrup to mask the taste.

Pros: shelf life
Cons: taste
Would I buy it again?  Not unless it can be used for baking/recipes.
Since eggs can he held for several months I'd rather go out and purchase 5 dozen eggs (for less money) and stick them in the fridge.

****CROSS POSTED in 'Taste Test' Thread****

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:43 pm

Honeyville's Dehydrated Eggs Put to the Test!



_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:46 pm

Safely Preserving Eggs
http://preparednesspro.com/safely-preserving-eggs/

By Kellene Bishop, The Preparedness Pro

Preserving eggs in the refrigerator for 9 months is unfathomable to most people, let alone safely preserving eggs that long without refrigeration. But today I’ll make crystal clear how you can preserve eggs worry-free without compromising your health and taste standards and perhaps I’ll even shed some light on how you came to believe that eggs can only be preserved in a refrigerator.

-Snip-

Yes, you can preserve your eggs long-term without worrying about your family getting sick. There are several methods you can use and I’ve written of a couple of ways previously, but my favorite one (because it’s the easiest) is using mineral oil. --- CONTINUED---

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:48 pm

Egg Substitute: Flaxseed

 Flaxseed = 1 Egg
http://histakes-food-storage.blogspot.com/2009/06/flaxseed-1-egg.html

You know how you use eggs in a lot of recipes? Do you have powdered eggs in your food storage for when you happen to run out? Or if the egg industry totally tanks and no eggs are to be found?

What will you do?

I just found a great substitution for eggs! Flaxseed. ...   ---CONTINUED---

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:49 pm

Putting the Foods You Love Into Food Storage
http://everythingunderthesunblog.blogspot.com/2008/11/book-2.html

“Eggs” from unflavored gelatin (Knox): Buy in bulk at bulkfoods.com. In all the recipes in this book I have substituted unflavored gelatin for the eggs. The gelatin is less expensive than powdered eggs (as little as 3 cents per tsp) and has an indefinite shelf life.

1tsp gelatin =1 egg, 1 oz gelatin = 12 tsp, 1 pound gelatin = 192 eggs.

Making one egg: Combine 1 tsp of unflavored gelatin with 3 Tb of cold water and stir until dissolved. Then add 2 Tb of hot water and stir. When using your own recipes, decrease the liquid called for in your recipe by about ¼ cup to compensate for the added water from the “egg”. I have already done this for the recipes in this book.

Eggs: Storing fresh eggs for up to 1 year. Rub warmed mineral oil on your hands and coat the entire surface of the fresh egg with the oil. Replace egg in carton with the point down. In cold climates they can be stored in a cool, dark place. In warmer climates, place in the refrigerator. Rotate once a year.

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:52 pm

How to Keeps Eggs Fresh for Months with Mineral Oil
http://www.askaprepper.com/keeps-eggs-fresh-months-mineral-oil/

A lot of the Egg Substitutes out there are good for baking, but what about when you have the urge to stick them between your toes, or feel the need to egg someone’s house? The egg substitutes just aren’t the same. So if you want to make sure you are never without eggs, don’t worry, you can preserve eggs with mineral oil! ---CONTINUED---

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by ReadyMom on Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:34 am

Egg Substitute: Chia

How to Make an Egg Substitute with Chia Seeds
https://www.foodrenegade.com/how-make-egg-substitute-chia-seeds/

  Do you want to know how to make an egg substitute with chia seeds? Did you even know that was possible?

I am an egg addict. I love eating eggs from pastured hens, love their firm, bright orange yolks, love how nutrient-dense and healthy they are. Yet sometimes I (gasp!) run out of eggs before I have the chance to buy them again from my local farmer.

When that happens and I need an egg substitute for some baked goods, I use chia seeds as an egg substitute. (This is also particularly useful for those with egg allergies!) ---CONTINUED---

_________________
Anything I post may NOT be used for commercial purposes or any type of 'For-Profit' distribution.
ReadyMom
ReadyMom
Admin

Posts : 1766
Join date : 2018-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Eggs . . . . . . .

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum